Distracted driver behaviour

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Distracted driver behaviour

Distracted driver behaviour impacts accidents worldwide
Article taken from InsuranceGateway

Road crashes are the single greatest annual cause of death nationwide. According to the Association for Safe International Road Travel, road traffic injuries predicted to become the fifth leading cause of death by 2030.

According to Lizette Erasmus, Head of Insurance Services at IntegriSure, most accidents on our roads are as a result of human error and if people drove more responsibly by taking cognisance of the responsibility that comes with driving, many accidents could be avoided.

“Distractions whilst you are driving reduce the awareness of your environment, your decision-making process and your driving performance that could result in an accident,” explains Erasmus.

She explains that talking on the phone, texting, eating, reading and grooming are just some of the ways drivers get distracted behind the wheel. “Using a mobile device whilst driving, remains one of the biggest issue when it comes to distracted driver behaviour.”

According to statistics released on drivers.com, “drivers who use a hand-held device are four times more likely to get into a car accident than drivers that pay attention to the road ahead. Individuals who text message while driving are 23 times more likely to get into an accident.”

Erasmus says people forget sometimes that driving is a skill that needs your undivided attention in order to ensure the safe control of your vehicle or quick response time to environmental factors that could happen around you.

Young children, other passengers and pets can also be a distraction whilst driving, therefore, Erasmus says it is imperative to strap your pets in a secure carrier, lay down driving rules for passengers and teach your children about the dangers associated with driving and how they can help you safely arrive at your destination. “You could offer young children some distraction like books, games and toys in order to occupy them during your journey.”

“Not only do we believe that this will have an impact on reducing accidents on our roads but there is further incentive for those insured as a result of fewer claims being logged.”

She further explains that fewer claims mean a larger pool of premium funds which could therefore result in a relief in motor insurance premiums.”

“People frequently drive distracted without any consequences. Most people think it will never happen to them, until one day it does. It only takes a split second of distraction to create a lifetime of pain and suffering. Remember, your decisions do not only affect you but other people on the road too,” concludes Erasmus.

Compiled by Insurance Gateway
Source: Epic Communications (Pty) Ltd